Author Archive
Green Infrastructure & LID Series: Permeable Paving

Green Infrastructure & LID Series: Permeable Paving

The Green Infrastructure & Low Impact Development Series explores some of the Best Management Practices (BMPs) of Green Infrastructure and LID for both urban and rural applications. The IRWP is currently working with local cities, counties and organizations to implement green infrastructure and LID elements within the Illinois River Watershed. Watch for these demonstration projects in...
Green Infrastructure & LID Series: Tree Wells

Green Infrastructure & LID Series: Tree Wells

This series explores some of the Best Management Practices (BMPs) of Green Infrastructure and LID for both urban and rural applications. The IRWP is currently working with our local cities, counties and organizations to implement these projects within the Illinois River Watershed. Watch for these demonstration projects in public spaces to see first-hand stormwater management in...
Green Infrastructure & Low Impact Development: Phosphorous Removal Structures

Green Infrastructure & Low Impact Development: Phosphorous Removal Structures

In our last Watershed Landscape post, we learned about Green Infrastructure as an ecological planning and design approach to building, developing and restoring our communities using natural and built systems that mimic nature. Low Impact Development (LID) is a part of Green Infrastructure, using smart stormwater design for new development or retrofits. LID applications can...
10 Inspiring Ideas to Achieve a Water-Smart Yard

10 Inspiring Ideas to Achieve a Water-Smart Yard

We first published this article back in February, when we were still dreaming of our summer garden…  today, as the temperatures heat up and the thunder storms roll through, it’s time to take another look at how to maximize the water in our yard!     For every 1,000 square feet of rooftop, a 1”...
Green Infrastructure & Low Impact Development: Providing Watershed Resiliency for more Sustainable Communities

Green Infrastructure & Low Impact Development: Providing Watershed Resiliency for more Sustainable Communities

Green Infrastructure is an ecological planning and design approach to building, developing and restoring our communities using natural and built systems that mimic nature. By using trees, native vegetation and improving soil function, urban and rural areas can be better connected by green spaces, which is good news for watershed health. From a watershed perspective,...
Spring-Bloomers: NW Arkansas Native Plants that Give us a Sense of Place

Spring-Bloomers: NW Arkansas Native Plants that Give us a Sense of Place

I know it’s time to go crappie fishing when the dogwoods start to bloom. I know it’s time for allergy relief gear when my white oak tree leafs out fully (and our cars are covered in a blanket of pollen). I know its spring in Northwest Arkansas when I see the streets and roads lined...
Watershed Landscape: Rain Garden Design Series -- Part III

Watershed Landscape: Rain Garden Design Series — Part III

Rain Garden Design Series: Part Three, Installing Your Rain Garden In our last Watershed Landscape post, Rain Garden Series Part Two, we provided simple steps to calculate the size of your rain garden, calculate how deep it should be, and provided some examples for planting design. Today’s post will cover the last part of your...
Watershed Landscape: Rain Garden Design -- Part II

Watershed Landscape: Rain Garden Design — Part II

Rain Garden Design Series: Part Two, Simple Design Calculations and Plant Selection In our last Watershed Landscape post, Rain Garden Series Part One, we explored the first steps to building a rain garden, which starts with good planning. This included understanding stormwater runoff on your property, site selection criteria, and conducting simple tests to know...
Watershed Landscape: Rain Garden Design - Part I

Watershed Landscape: Rain Garden Design – Part I

Rain Garden Design Series: Part One, Site Selection Installing a rain garden on your property can be a fun, rewarding experience that will yield benefits for your landscape, community and our watershed! Rain gardens are intended to capture and filter stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces, such as rooftops, roads and parking lots. They are a...
Watershed Landscape:  Rain Garden Pre-Spring To-Dos

Watershed Landscape: Rain Garden Pre-Spring To-Dos

Spring is peeping its head around the corner and you know what that means… Time to start thinking of our Rain Garden To-Do’s! Here are some quick tips to give you a head start on a beautiful, storm-soaking landscape feature that will yield big benefits for the upcoming rainy season! Trimming Perennial Grasses allows for new...
Watershed Landscape: 10 Inspiring Ideas to Achieve a Water-Smart Yard

Watershed Landscape: 10 Inspiring Ideas to Achieve a Water-Smart Yard

For every 1,000 square feet of rooftop, a 1” rain will generate approximately 608 gallons of water. Nearly 28,000 gallons of water each year pours off  the average roof in the Illinois River Watershed. Imagine all that rainwater going down the storm drains and into the River! Imagine, instead, all that water going into our...
Watershed Landscape: The Dirt on Soils

Watershed Landscape: The Dirt on Soils

Protecting both the land and the water is a primary focus of the Illinois River Watershed Partnership and we work to educate our community on ways to make a positive difference so that our natural resources are around for future generations to enjoy.  So let’s talk about dirt…   Understanding Soil Infographic Photo: The Denver...